Heart Disease Tag

Blog entries from the web site of Linda Carney MD located at http://www.DrCarney.com.

All blog entries tagged as Heart Disease
  1. Consistent consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages may increase likelihood of developing of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    This study investigated the link between high intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and the odds of developing coronary heart disease (CHD). Researchers reviewed and analyzed dietary and clinical data extracted from 4 prospective studies.

    The team of investigators observed that male subjects who regularly consumed sugar-sweetened beverages demonstrated a significant elevation in coronary heart disease development risk. A 16% increase in coronary heart disease risk was found to be associated with the consumption of an extra serving of sugar-sweetened beverage per day was in this study. The results of this study support dietary recommendation that promote the reduction and total exclusion of sugar-sweetened beverages from diets.

  2. Consistent consumption of high fiber diets may help reduce ischaemic heart disease mortality risk.

    This study evaluated the relationship between dietary fiber intake and ischaemic heart disease mortality (IHD) risk. Researchers reviewed dietary and clinical records of 306,331 men and women recruited from eight European countries. They observed that regular consumers of high fiber diets had slim chances of dying from ischaemic heart disease. The consumption of an extra 10g of dietary fiber per day was found to decrease ischaemic heart disease mortality risk by 15%. The findings of this study reveal that generous intake of fiber-rich foods may confer individuals with adequate protection against deaths due to ischemic heart disease.

  3. Low ischaemic heart disease mortality risk is associated with generous intake of fruits and vegetables.

    This study investigated the association between high dietary intake of fruits and vegetables and the incidence of deaths from ischaemic heart disease (IHD). Researchers tracked dietary and mortality records of 313,074 men and women without any previous history of myocardial infarction and stroke recruited from 8 different European countries.

    The team of investigators discovered that regular consumption of 8 portions (80g per portion) of fruits and vegetables reduce the likelihood of developing fatal ischaemic heart disease by 22%. A 4% reduction in fatal ischaemic heart disease risk was found in subjects who consumed an additional portion of fruits and vegetables. Data from this study suggest that habitual consumption of large servings of fruits and vegetables may decrease the incidence of deaths due to ischaemic heart disease.

  4. Men who regularly consume large servings of vegetables are less prone to develop coronary heart disease.

    This study investigated the relationship between consistent dietary ingestion of vegetables and the odds of developing coronary heart disease (CHD) in men. Researchers tracked the diets of 15,220 male subjects without stroke, cancer, and heart disease recruited from the Physician's Health Study for 12 years. The coronary heart disease odds ratio of each participant in this study was also determined.

    Researchers found out that subjects with high intake of vegetables had lower risk of developing coronary heart disease than those who totally avoid or rarely consume vegetables. The findings of this study support recommendations that promote the increased consumption of vegetables for the reduction of coronary heart disease risk in men.

  5. Adequate intake of fiber-rich foods may help guard against cardiovascular diseases, such as stroke and coronary heart disease.

    This study evaluated the association between pre-illness intake of dietary fiber and the risk of subsequent diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, such as stroke and coronary heart disease (CHD). Researchers analyzed nutritional and clinical data obtained from 86,387 cancer- and cardiovascular disease-free subjects recruited from the Japanese Public Health Center-based Study Cohort.

    The team of investigators found out subjects on high fiber diets had slim chances of developing cardiovascular diseases, such as stroke and coronary heart disease. The cardioprotective effect of dietary fiber was found to be strongest for insoluble fiber and was observed primarily in non-smokers (not in smokers) in this study. The findings of this study lend further support to the hypothesis that increased consumption of fiber-rich foods may protect individuals, particularly non-smokers, from developing cardiovascular disorders.

  6. Frequent consumers of fiber-rich foods, especially cereals and fruits, are less likely to die from cardiovascular ailments, such as coronary heart disease.

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between regular consumption of fiber-rich foods and the incidence of cardiovascular mortality among Japanese men and women. Using self-administered food frequency questionnaires, researchers collated and analyzed data on the dietary fiber consumption rate of 58,730 Japanese men and women within the age bracket of 40-79 years. The cardiovascular mortality hazard ratio of each participant in this study was also ascertained.

    Researchers observed a lower incidence of deaths from cardiovascular ailments, such as coronary heart disease, among habitual consumers of high fiber diets rich in cereals and fruits. The cardiovascular mortality risk-lowering effect of dietary fiber was found to be stronger in women than in men in this study. The results of this study show support the growing body of evidence that high fiber diets may be vital in the prevention of deaths from cardiovascular-related diseases.

  7. Adequate intake of high fiber diets, particularly those rich in water soluble fiber, may help slash down coronary heart disease risk.

     This study was carried out to determine the correlation between dietary fiber intake and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Researchers collated and analyzed data on the dietary fiber consumption rate of 9,776 cardiovascular disease-free US men and women that participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I Epidemiologic Follow-up Study. The coronary heart disease odds ratio of each of the participant in this study was also ascertained.

    Researchers found a protective association between dietary fiber consumption, particularly water-soluble fiber, and coronary heart disease. The findings of this study lend further support to the hypothesis that high intake of fiber-rich foods is associated with low coronary heart and cardiovascular disease risk.

 

Use of this websites is for informational purposes only and does not contain medical advice or create a Physician/Patient relationship between you and Linda Carney MD.

Back to top