Hypertension Tag

Blog entries from the web site of Linda Carney MD located at http://www.DrCarney.com.

All blog entries tagged as Hypertension
  1. Consistent consumption of sugar-sweetened and artificial-sweetened beverages may increase an individual's susceptibility to hypertension.

    This study assessed the intake of sugar-sweetened and artificial-sweetened beverages in relation to hypertension risk. Researchers systematically reviewed data and evidence extracted from 6 studies that examined 246,822 subjects and 80,628 cases of hypertension.

    The research team found out that regular consumers of sugar-sweetened and artificial-sweetened beverages were at increased risk of developing hypertension. The consumption of an extra serving of sugar-sweetened beverage per day was found to increase an individual's chances of suffering from hypertension by 8%. The results of this study indicate that high consumers of sugar-sweetened and artificial-sweetened beverages may be more prone to develop hypertension.

  2. Generous intake of fried foods may increase the likelihood of developing hypertension.

    ​This study investigated the relationship between high dietary ingestion of fried foods and the development of hypertension. Researchers collated and analyzed data on the fried food consumption rate and the hypertension odds ratio of over 13,679 subjects recruited from a Mediterranean cohort that comprises of Spanish university graduates. They observed that subjects who frequently consumed fried foods had higher risk of developing hypertension than those who rarely ate or completely avoided fried foods. The findings of this study indicate that hypertension is more likely to occur among regular consumers of fried foods.

  3. High consumers of nuts are less likely to suffer from hypertension and coronary artery disease (CAD).

    This study investigated the relationship between high dietary ingestion of nuts and the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, such as stroke, hypertension, and coronary artery disease (CAD). Researchers analyzed data extracted from 19 publications that examined 785,049 subjects.

    Researchers observed that subjects who consistently consumed large servings of nuts had slight chances of developing hypertension and coronary artery disease. In contrast, generous intake of nuts was found to have little or no effect on type 2 diabetes and stroke risk. The findings of this study demonstrate that diets that promote nut consumption may prevent individuals from developing cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension and coronary artery disease.

  4. Whole food plant-based diets may improve the conditions of patients suffering from obesity, ischaemic heart disease, hypertension,and type 2 diabetes.

    This study examined the effect of whole food plant-based diets on obesity, hypertension, ischaemic heart disease, and Ttype 2 diabetes. Researchers divided 65 overweight participants with a history of heart disease or type 2 diabetes into two groups: the intervention group (fed with low-fat vegan diets with no calorie restrictions) and the control group (placed on normal care). The weight and cholesterol levels of all the participants in this study were also monitored.

    Researchers discovered that members of the intervention group experienced more weight loss and significant reduction in plasma level of cholesterol than those in the control cohort. The findings of this study show that whole food plant-based diets may be beneficial to patients suffering from obesity, ischaemic heart disease, hypertension,and type 2 diabetes.

  5. Regular consumption of processed meats is associated with a greater risk of hypertension in women.

    This study evaluated the relationship between the consumption of red meat and the occurrence of hypertension. Using validated and reproducible food frequency questionnaires, researchers examined the unprocessed and processed red meat intakes of 44,616 healthy French women. The hypertension odds ratio of each of the participant in this study was also assessed.

    Researchers observed a high incidence of hypertension among subjects who consistently consumed large amounts of processed meats. On the other hand, high dietary ingestion of unprocessed red meat was found to have little or no effect on hypertension risk. Subjects with a weekly processed meat intake of 5 or more servings had 17% higher risk of developing hypertension than those who consumed less than 1 serving of processed meats per week. The findings of this study suggest that generous intake of diets high in processed meats may accelerate the development of hypertension in women.

  6. Exercise Your Power to Choose Health We often hear the term "lifestyle diseases" bandied about. But what are these diseases? Lifestyle diseases are defined as those negative, chronic health conditions which are brought on by our choices about food, exercise, and the use of substances like tobacco, alcohol, and drugs. We all know there are dangers associated with substance use...
  7. Generous intake of diets high in whole grains may significantly cut down metabolic syndrome risk.

    This study evaluated the correlation between whole grain and refined grain intakes and metabolic syndrome risk. Using validated food frequency questionnaires, researchers examined the diets of 827 Iranian men and women within the age bracket of 18-72 years. The weight, height, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), triglyceride, cholesterol, lipoprotein, and fasting plasma glucose levels were measured in each subject.

    Researchers discovered that subjects who consumed greater amounts of whole grains had lower risk of developing metabolic syndrome than those who never or seldom ate whole grains. High refined grain intake was found to accelerate the development of hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and metabolic syndrome, but not diabetes. The results of this study show that high consumption of diets rich in refined grains may increase an individual’s susceptibility to the development of metabolic syndrome.

 

Use of this websites is for informational purposes only and does not contain medical advice or create a Physician/Patient relationship between you and Linda Carney MD.

Back to top