Protein Tag

Blog entries from the web site of Linda Carney MD located at http://www.DrCarney.com.

All blog entries tagged as Protein
  1. Cure Cancer by Eating Meat? (Beware of Clickbait) Have you ever been tempted to click on the link to an article whose title contained an outrageous proposal? Beware the lure of Clickbait . The titles of these articles suck us in with annoying half-truths. Each time we click, the site earns ad revenues. Judging from the rise in the number of misleading...
  2. High consumption of proteins of plant origin may diminish the risk of developing ovulatory infertility.

    This study examined the association between the consumption of proteins from plant and animal sources and the incidence of ovulatory infertility. Researchers examined the diets of 18,555 married women who were without any history of infertility and planning to get pregnant for 8 years. The relative risk of ovulatory infertility in all the subjects were also assessed.

    Researchers observed a lower incidence of ovulatory infertility in subjects who obtained their proteins from plant sources than in those who frequently consumed animal proteins. A 50% reduction in the risk of ovulatory infertility was found in subjects who obtained 5% of their energy needs from vegetable proteins in this study. The findings of this research work reveal that substituting animal proteins with plant proteins in a diet could lower the risk of developing ovulatory infertility in women within childbearing age.

  3. Animal Protein Damages Kidney Function We hear it all the time: protein. If we're hungry midafternoon, our coworker wonders if we didn't include enough protein in our lunch. If we say we're feeling tired lately, our sister asks if we're eating enough protein. If we twist our ankle, our neighbor wants to know… Okay, that's an exaggeration, but you...
  4. Cooked beans contain more nutrients than canned beans.

    This study compared the nutrient content and nutrient-to-cost ratio between cooked and canned beans. Researchers analyzed the prices of dried cooked and canned or drained of black, kidney, lima, pinto, garbanzo, white beans, and black-eyed peas in 60 grocery stores in January 2009. The nutrient density per 100g of cooked and canned beans was calculated using the U.S Department Nutrient Database for standard reference.

    Researchers found out that dried cooked beans had higher fiber, protein, potassium, magnesium, fiber, iron, and energy but lesser sodium content than canned or drained beans had. Cooked beans were also observed to cost less than canned beans in this study.The findings of this study reveal that dried cooked beans supply the body with more nutrients than canned or drained beans do.

  5. But Doctor, Do I HAVE to Eat Kale? The environmental movement isn't the only one to advocate "going green;" physicians, nutritionist, and medical researchers are all trumpeting the benefits of "going green" at mealtimes, and kale seems to be the focus of all the buzz. But just exactly how much kale should we be eating? And how much kale do those physicians,...
  6. Part I: Do Plant-Based Diets Need Supplementing? As a dietician, Novick advocates for a whole-foods plant-based diet in order to get sufficient protein. "Nature has made sure we are protected against a protein deficiency, as all whole, natural foods are abundant in protein. Whole grains, starchy vegetables, vegetables, and legumes are all excellent sources of high-quality protein." My article, " Current...
  7. Can a Plant-Based Diet Prevent/Treat Kidney Stones? Kidney stones affect approximately 1 in 11 people in the United States, although only 1 in 20 were affected 20 years ago. The incidence of kidney stones has been rising steadily after World War II and affects more men than women. Anyone who has passed a stone knows how painful it can be. Typically,...

 

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